Thursday, March 13, 2014

Die, Sister, Die; Jean Harlow; Arnold

Watching a public domain 1972 thriller called Die, Sister, Die, about a guy who hires a nurse to help care for his horrible sister. She has all the money, so he wants to conspire with the nurse to kill her.

The trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GZdRa0-y06w

It's not very interesting, but I did learn that there are people who don't know that a "made-for-TV movie" is a movie that was literally made to be shown on TV.  

Die, Sister, Die was a theatrical film, it has an MPAA rating. Movies that were made for TV are listed as such on imdb.com. But comments on the site keep calling it a made-for-TV movie. I can see how they would suspect that, but it simply wasn't.

Arnold, Jean Harlow

I saw a movie at a drive-in when I was about ten. A horror-comedy called Arnold. Arnold is a rich guy who's died. Because he's dead, he's no longer married to his wife, and he's able to marry his mistress. They explain that dead people can marry because, in the past, soldiers at war were able to legally marry through the mail, and the marriages had been deemed legally valid even if the soldier had been killed by the time the letter arrived.

 The trailer: http://youtu.be/XQxLdeEE51w

It turns out that Arnold left a lot of booby traps and kills all the people he was mad at in ways that aren't plausible, creative, interesting or funny. At least, that's what I thought when I was ten.

The trailer makes it look a lot more cinematic than I remembered. I haven't seen it in 40 years. At the time, I thought the movie had an odd sort of video look to it, it was full of (sort of) English actors I didn't recognize when I was ten, it was kind of plodding and I started to think that it must have been a made-for-British-TV movie, shot on videotape and transferred to film for release in the US. I was wrong.

But these things did happen. There was a big budget biopic of Jean Harlow in 1965. To cash in, the producers of a made-for-TV shot-on-videotape Jean Harlow biography transferred the video to film (called "Electronovision" back then) and released it theatrically.


Here's the trailer:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZcuBj_sbfRQ

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